While such questions have stumped few students, they have baffled some of the most credentialed scholars of our era—the famed author Dr. Bart Ehrman among them. In his book, Jesus, Interrupted, Ehrman expresses his bewilderment: “In Mark’s Gospel, Jesus tells Peter that he will deny him three times ‘before the cock crows twice.’ In Matthew’s Gospel he tells him that it will be ‘before the cock crows.’ Well, which is it—before the cock crows once or twice?’” Hank Hanegraaff, the host of the 𝘉𝘪𝘣𝘭𝘦 𝘈𝘯𝘴𝘸𝘦𝘳 𝘔𝘢𝘯 broadcast and the 𝘏𝘢𝘯𝘬 𝘜𝘯𝘱𝘭𝘶𝘨𝘨𝘦𝘥 podcast, notes that the problem here is fundamentalism—fundamentalism from the left, but fundamentalism nonetheless. In recounting past events or telling stories, we obviously don’t all highlight the same details. In the case at hand, Mark simply provided a bit more detail than did Matthew. As his more attentive readers have likely discovered, Professor Ehrman is obsessing over what in reality is a nonissue. Careful observation reveals that Matthew did not comment how many times the rooster crowed. Matthew simply told us that the rooster crowed. In sharp contrast to the methodology of Ehrmanites, erudite scholarship seeks a reliable core set of facts in order to validate historical accounts.